Business Intelligence Solutions for Manufacturers - LAEDC ft. D. Lavinsky

LAEDC is hosting a webinar session featuring our president Dave Lavinsky!

Details:

June 26, 2014

12:00pm - 1:00pm (PST)

Free Webinar  

RSVP

Join us on June 26 for a discussion with Dave Lavinsky, President with Growthink. Guiding Metrics provides real-time business intelligence to help manufacturers move past cost cutting and lean manufacturing methods to become even more efficient, more competitive and more profitable.

The webinar provides a step by step walk through of the major metrics and systems Guiding Metrics has found in most clients and how the dashboard can be relevant to growing manufacturing businesses.The session will then be followed by Q & A.


This webinar is part of LAEDC's new Better Business Webinar Series.  

There is no cost to attend this webinar.   

Register to attend here.

Learn more about how the LAEDC can assist your company in coming to, expanding in, and staying within Los Angeles County.  

Here are the apps teens actually love, in 5 charts

June 19, 2014 11:20 AM 
Gregory Ferenstein
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Teens. Since the beginning of humanity, they’ve always represented what the future of humanity would look like. Now, thanks to a new survey, we have an idea of what kinds of websites, apps, and online services the future of humanity will enjoy– at least for the next few years of existence. Then, an entirely new crop of startups replaces the upstarts that recently rose to power.

Curator startup Niche conducted a sizable survey of 7,000 teens, and this is what it found:

Popularity in general

Dashboard_4

Facebook and Youtube reign supreme, with 61 percent and 55 percent of daily active users, respectively. Instagram and the Facebook-nemesis team over at Snapchat are neck-and-neck in the race for photo sharing apps (around 50 percent).

Signs are good for the beleaguered micro-messaging app, Twitter, with 35 percent, a trend that has seen dramatic growth over the past two years.

The sad panda award goes to Foursquare, with a self-reported zero-percent daily active userbase among teens (3 percent overall). Of course, there are certainly teens that use Foursquare daily, but not enough to be picked up in a pretty large survey.

Finally, no shocker: The largely unemployed slice of teens legally required to attend high school do not spend much time polishing their Linkedin Profiles (2 percent daily use) — this in spite of LinkedIn’sefforts to court college applicants.

The Atlantic’s Derek Thompson has a nice graph ranking all of the popular websites/services by daily use.

Screen Shot 2014-06-19 at 10.35.39 AM

News

Teens must love listicles and sideboob stories: 15 percent report reading Buzzfeed occasionally, and 21 percent visit the Huffington Post. The Onion and Reddit are tied for the semi-serious news gold medal, at about 10 percent of occasional users.

news

Entertainment

YouTube dominates video with 55 percent daily users. The fact that Hulu is at around 23 percent of daily users is more evidence that teens aren’t just watching TV online — they are watching traditional TV programming much less.

video

Pandora leads the pack on music (37 percent), meaning that discovery could be more important than random access(14 percent report using Spotify, and 32 percent, iTunes).

music

Story here

You can see the full survey here.

The Data Behind the CNBC Disruptor 50

Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers has invested in 20% of companies on the CNBC Disruptor 50. The companies on the list have raised a whopping $3.75B in 2014 already.

CNBC recently released its second annual Disruptor 50 list – a list of 50 private companies nominated by venture capital firms and accelerators that ranges from household consumer mobile apps like Uber and Snapchat to green tech firms including Cool Planet andChargepoint. Given interest around the list, we used CB Insights data to crunch the numbers behind the financing trends, most well-funded cos and top investors of CNBC’s selected private companies.

The data below.

It must be the money

CNBC’s list of companies includes a number of well-funded startups – with some, includingAirBnB and Pinterest, having raised war chests well into the hundreds of millions to date. The chart below highlights the deal and dollar fundraising trend by the CNBC Disruptor 50 from 2009 through 2014 year-to-date. Yes, companies on the list have increasingly raised huge sums of cash – already topping $3.75 billion (with a B) in 2014 alone behind mega rounds toUber, AirBnB and Dropbox.

cnbc1

Kleiner Perkins is top investor in CNBC 50 companies

Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers is the most represented venture capital firm on the list of CNBC 50 companies, with 10 of the startups in its portfolio including Shape Security,AngelList and Quirky. We’d earlier highlighted Kleiner’s robust list of Tech IPO Pipeline companies. SV Angel and Founders Fund round out the top 3 with 9 and 8 companies on the list, respectively. Interestingly, active tech mutual fund investor T. Rowe Price is tied for fourth most companies with late-stage investments including ApptioPure Storage andRedfin.

A list of all the investors with five or more companies on the CNBC Disruptor 50 is below.

cnbc50investors

Most well-funded – Uber on top

The chart below highlights the range of funding totals behind the 50 companies from under $20M (Kickstarter) to over $1B (Uber). 72% of companies on the list have raised between $20M and $150M, with 15 companies on the list raising between $50M-$100M and another 11 raising between $20M-$50M.

cnbc3

See below for the list of the CNBC 50 ranked by total funding raised (credit/debt, secondary transactions not included).
Uber
Palantir Technologies
AirBnB
Pinterest
Dropbox
Spotify
Pure Storage
MongoDB
Lending Club
10 DocuSign
11 SpaceX
12 Quirky
13 Moderna
14 Oscar Health Insurance Co.
15 Cool Planet Energy Systems
16 Apptio
17 Snapchat
18 Zuora
19 Stripe
20 Warby Parker
21 Yext
22 Twilio
23 Chargepoint
24 GitHub
25 Aereo
26 Redfin
27 Etsy
28 Skybox Imaging
29 Motif Investing
30 Bill.com
31 Birchbox
32 Fon
33 Shape Security
34 Wealthfront
35 Kymeta
36 EcoMotors
37 Personal Capital
38 Rent the Runway
39 Dataminr
40 BrightRoll
41 Betterment
42 Fullscreen
43 TransferWise
44 Coinbase
45 Hampton Creek Foods
46 Kumu Networks
46 Nebula
48 AngelList
49 Nexmo
50 KickStarter

Growthink president on the power of real-time BI

Two weeks ago we had the honor of having Growthink president, Dave Lavinsky, in our Los Angeles office for a lunch presentation on the power of business intelligence and real-time dashboards.

Participants from various sectors had the opportunity to interact with Dave and walk through key metrics that should be more effectively tracked to contribute to better company success.

Thank you Dave for your time and look forward to many more of these sessions in the future!


Having big data is important but understanding the data is crucial to success

BIG DATA SUCCESS: the sweet spot between uptime and bottom line

"It's not exactly breaking news that data analytics is a rapidly exploding field within Australian businesses, with different organisations and industries across the country at different stages of maturity. ADMA estimate that around 30% of Australian businesses are currently at some point on the big data continuum between data discovery and data commercialisation.

The potential value of all of the data available to enterprises and SME’s cannot be underestimated; fact is, in our Information Age the competitive advantage will rest with those businesses who are best able to harness their data in order to make real-time decisions that protect their customer base and grow market share. With this in mind, why is it then that only 30% of businesses are taking action with their data?"

For the rest of the article please visit: https://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140617222618-21497568-big-data-success-the-sweet-spot-between-uptime-and-bottom-line?trk=tod-home-art-list-large_0

Though the article itself centers around the Australian market, the same concerns are readily observed across the globe.

Congratulations to Growthink client DNT Express on their recent approval for financing!

Congratulations DNT Express on being approved for a $2.25 million loan! Excited to see what the future holds and how you'll continue to grow.

DNT Express is a wine distribution company located at the Capital District Regional Market in Menands, NY.  The company was founded in July, 2003 by brothers Dan and Tim Nickels.  Early on, DNT hauled a variety of products, from pharmaceuticals to auto parts. Now the Company provides wine delivery services from Rockland County to the Canadian border.  It currently serves over 100 distributors by transporting their wines to over 3,000 wine retailers and restaurants.


New insights on how to use Twitter for your business

From the Twitter blog

One of the best ways to learn about marketing on Twitter is through real examples from small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs). Recently, we spoke with a group of these companies about how they use Twitter as a business tool, the results they’ve seen, and their tips for success.

We partnered with research firm DB5 to survey 1100 SMB owners and employees in the U.S. Those surveyed work on their company’s digital marketing strategy, and are active Twitter users and advertisers. Visual.ly helped us create an infographic to detail the full survey results, which revealed that SMBs see Twitter as an effective marketing tool that enables them to accomplish their advertising goals.

Interestingly, two-thirds (66%) of respondents believe that they have not yet fully maximized their Twitter presence.

Stock Offerings and Securities Laws - Broker-Dealer Registration

An emerging business seeking to raise capital by selling stock or other securities often does so without the assistance of an investment banker, relying instead on its own officers, directors and employees to conduct the offering. The “self-distribution” of securities by the issuer and its personnel may be undertaken because an investment banker cannot be attracted or because the issuer desires to avoid paying selling commissions. Whatever the reason for self-distribution, the process raises broker-dealer registration issues.

Broker-dealers must register with the SEC unless they are engaged solely in intrastate business or in the business of trading exempted securities. State securities laws also generally require the registration of broker-dealers.

The failure to register as a broker-dealer if required can result in government enforcement action and monetary penalties. In addition, there is a significant risk that the offering could be subject to rescission by investors whose purchase of the securities was induced by an unregistered broker-dealer.

Federal Law 
“Broker” is defined in the federal Securities Exchange Act to generally mean any person engaged in the business of effecting transactions in securities for the account of others. “Dealer” is defined to generally mean any person engaged in the business of buying and selling securities for such person’s own account, through a broker or otherwise.

With self-distribution, the issuer and its personnel are not likely to fall within the definition of dealer because typically they are not both buying and selling the security. While the issuer would not fall within the definition of broker because it is not effecting transactions for the account of others, the issuer’s personnel are doing so (i.e., they are effecting transactions for the account of the issuer) and might meet the broker definition, subjecting them to broker-dealer registration requirements. The principal question for the issuer’s personnel is whether they are “engaged in the business” of effecting transactions in securities for the account of others.

To avoid uncertainty about whether someone is “engaged in the business” of effecting transactions in securities for the account of others, Exchange Act Rule 3a4–1 was adopted by the SEC as a nonexclusive safe harbor from the definition of broker for personnel of an issuer who assist the issuer in connection with the offer and sale of its securities. Generally, under the rule, an “associated person of an issuer” (a term that includes, among others, any person who is a partner, officer, director, or employee of the issuer) will not be deemed to be a broker by reason of his or her participation in the sale of securities of the issuer if the person:

  • Is not subject to a statutory disqualification under Exchange Act §3(a)(39); 
  • Is not compensated for participation in the sale by the payment of commissions or other remuneration based on transactions in securities; and 
  • Is not at the time of participation an associated person of a broker or dealer.

In addition to the requirements enumerated above, to take advantage of the rule the associated person must meet one of the following conditions:

  • The associated person (1) primarily performs substantial duties for the issuer other than in connection with transactions in securities; (2) was not a broker or a dealer or an associated person of a broker or dealer within the preceding 12 months; and (3) does not participate in selling securities for any issuer more than once every 12 months, with certain exceptions; or
  • The associated person does no more than (1) prepare approved written communications and deliver such communications without oral solicitation of potential purchasers; (2) respond to inquiries initiated by potential purchasers so long as the response is limited to information contained in the registration statement or other offering document; and (3) perform ministerial and clerical work related to the transaction; or
  • The associated person limits participation to transactions enumerated in Rule 3a4–1(a)(4)(i), most of which would not generally be applicable to an offering by an emerging business seeking to raise capital but which include sales of securities that are (1) made to a registered broker or dealer, a registered investment company, an insurance company, a bank or savings and loan association, or certain trust companies and trusts; or (2) made in accordance with a bonus, profit sharing, pension, retirement, thrift, savings, incentive, stock purchase, stock ownership, stock appreciation, stock option, dividend reinvestment, or similar plan for employees of the issuer or one of its subsidiaries.